Solve These Tough Data Problems and Watch Job Offers Roll In

Late in 2015, Gilberto Titericz, an electrical engineer at Brazil’s state oil company Petrobras, told his boss he planned to resign, after seven years maintaining sensors and other hardware in oil plants. By devoting hundreds of hours of leisure time to the obscure world of competitive data analysis, Titericz had recently become the world’s top-ranked data scientist, by one reckoning. Silicon Valley was calling. “Only when I wanted to quit did they realize they had the number-one data scientist,” he says.

Petrobras held on to its champ for a time by moving Titericz into a position that used his data skills. But since topping the rankings that October he’d received a stream of emails from recruiters around the globe, including representatives of Tesla and Google. This past February, another well-known tech company hired him, and moved his family to the Bay Area this summer. Titericz described his unlikely journey recently over colorful plates of Nigerian food at the headquarters of his new employer, Airbnb.

Titericz earned, and holds, his number-one rank on a website called Kaggle that has turned data analysis into a kind of sport, and transformed the lives of some competitors. Companies, government agencies, and researchers post datasets on the platform and invite Kaggle’s more than one million members to discern patterns and solve problems. Winners get glory, points toward Kaggle’s rankings of its top 66,000 data scientists, and sometimes cash prizes.

Ryan Young for Wired

Alone and in small teams with fellow Kagglers, Titericz estimates he has won around $ 100,000 in contests that included predicting seizures from brainwaves for the National Institutes of Health, the price of metal tubes for Caterpillar, and rental property values for Deloitte. The TSA and real-estate site Zillow are each running competitions offering prize money in excess of $ 1 million.

Veteran Kagglers say the opportunities that flow from a good ranking are generally more bankable than the prizes. Participants say they learn new data-analysis and machine-learning skills. Plus, the best performers like the 95 “grandmasters” that top Kaggle’s rankings are highly sought talents in an occupation crucial to today’s data-centric economy. Glassdoor has declared data scientist the best job in America for the past two years, based on the thousands of vacancies, good salaries, and high job satisfaction. Companies large and small recruit from Kaggle’s fertile field of problem solvers.

In March, Google came calling and acquired Kaggle itself. It has been integrated into the company’s cloud-computing division, and begun to emphasize features that let people and companies share and test data and code outside of competitions, too. Google hopes other companies will come to Kaggle for the people, code, and data they need for new projects involving machine learning—and run them in Google’s cloud.

Kaggle grandmasters say they’re driven as much by a compulsion to learn as to win. The best take extreme lengths to do both. Marios Michailidis, a previous number one now ranked third, got the data-science bug after hearing a talk on entrepreneurship from a man who got rich analyzing trends in horseraces. To Michailidis, the money was not the most interesting part. “This ability to explore and predict the future seemed like a superpower to me,” he says. Michailidis taught himself to code, joined Kaggle, and before long was spending what he estimates was 60 hours a week on contests—in addition to a day job. “It was very enjoyable because I was learning a lot,” he says.

Michailidis has since cut back to roughly 30 hours a week, in part due to the toll on his body. Titericz says his own push to top the Kaggle rankings, made not long after the birth of his second daughter, caused some friction with his wife. “She’d get mad with me every time I touched the computer,” he says.

Entrepreneur SriSatish Ambati has made Kagglers a core strategy of his startup, H2O, which makes data-science tools for customers including eBay and Capital One. Ambati hired Michailidis and three other grandmasters after he noticed a surge in downloads when H2O’s software was used to win a Kaggle contest. Victors typically share their methods in the site’s busy forums to help others improve their technique.

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H2O’s data celebrities work on the company’s products, providing both expertise and a marketing boost akin to a sports star endorsing a sneaker. “When we send a grandmaster to a customer call their entire data-science team wants to be there,” Ambati says. “Steve Jobs had a gut feel for products; grandmasters have that for data.” Jeremy Achin, cofounder of startup DataRobot, which competes with H2O and also has hired grandmasters, says high Kaggle rankings also help weed out poseurs trying to exploit the data-skills shortage. “There are many people calling themselves data scientists who are not capable of delivering actual work,” he says.

Competition between people like Ambati and Achin helps make it lucrative to earn the rank of grandmaster. Michailidis, who works for Mountain View, California-based H2O from his home in London, says his salary has tripled in three years. Before joining H2O, he worked for customer analytics company Dunnhumby, a subsidiary of supermarket Tesco.

Large companies like Kaggle champs, too. An Intel job ad posted this month seeking a machine-learning researcher lists experience winning Kaggle contests as a requirement. Yelp and Facebook have run Kaggle contests that dangle a chance to interview for a job as a prize for a good finish. The winner of Facebook’s most recent contest last summer was Tom Van de Wiele, an engineer for Eastman Chemical in Ghent, Belgium, who was seeking a career change. Six months later, he started a job at Alphabet’s artificial-intelligence research group DeepMind.

H2O is trying to bottle some of the lightning that sparks from Kaggle grandmasters. Select customers are testing a service called Driverless AI that automates some of a data scientist’s work, probing a dataset and developing models to predict trends. More than 6,000 companies and people are on the waitlist to try Driverless. Ambati says that reflects the demand for data-science skills, as information piles up faster than companies can analyze it. But no one at H2O expects Driverless to challenge Titericz or other Kaggle leaders anytime soon. For all the data-crunching power of computers, they lack the creative spark that makes a true grandmaster.

“If you work on a data problem in a company you need to talk with managers, and clients,” says Stanislav Semenov, a grandmaster and former number one in Moscow, who is now ranked second. He likes to celebrate Kaggle wins with a good steak. “Competitions are only about building the best models, it’s pure and I love it.” On Kaggle, data analysis is not just a sport, but an art.

Tech

Consumer goods firms harness online data to tap Southeast Asia e-commerce boom

SINGAPORE/BANGKOK (Reuters) – When diaper maker DSG International (Thailand) wants to know what its customers are thinking, it often turns to Lazada, an e-commerce firm majority-owned by Alibaba Group Holding (BABA.N).

FILE PHOTO: The Singapore Lazada website is seen in this illustration photo June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Thomas White/Illustration/File Photo

“From (their) data, we know mothers sometimes browse at night, so we can offer flash sales when we know customers are browsing,” says Ambrose Chan, the Thai company’s CEO.

Southeast Asia is the world’s fastest-growing internet market, home to 600 million consumers from Vietnam to Indonesia via Singapore, many of them tech- and social media-savvy. They are rapidly spending more time and money online. A Nielsen study in 2015 estimated Southeast Asia’s middle-class will hit 400 million by 2020, doubling from 2012.

Gross merchandise value of ecommerce in Southeast Asia will balloon to $ 65.5 billion by 2021, from $ 14.3 billion last year, predicts consultancy Frost & Sullivan.

Research firm Euromonitor forecasts internet retailing in Indonesia, for example, will more than double to $ 6.2 billion by 2021, and Thailand will increase 85 percent to $ 2.8 billion.

(For a graphic on Southeast Asia internet sales click reut.rs/2l3qULe)

Consumer goods firms, such as Unilever (UNc.AS) and Japanese cosmetics firm Shiseido (4911.T), say the e-commerce boom allows them to push deeper into markets that can otherwise be difficult to understand and tough to penetrate due to poor retail networks and infrastructure.

“Data from Lazada has been used to position certain products where consumer preferences are different. For example, Thai customers like to buy diapers in special cartons, while Malaysians prefer multiple packs,” says Chan.

To reach more customers and get a better handle on their online behavior, consumer goods companies are forging partnerships with e-commerce firms like Lazada and fashion website Zalora.

POWERFUL, INSIGHTFUL

A customer who clicked on a 50 milliliter product may instead buy a smaller 30 ml product, said Pranay Mehra, vice president, digital and e-commerce at Shiseido Asia Pacific, noting that data and online selling experience can help firms bundle offers, decide on packaging and distribution, and influence where to set up a physical presence.

“This data is very powerful and very insightful, if used properly,” Mehra added.

Unilever, whose products range from Hellmann’s mayonnaise to Dove soap, said it is seeing more demand from rural consumers in developing markets like Indonesia and Vietnam.

RedMart’s President Vikram Rupani poses at their fulfillment centre in Singapore September 22, 2017. Picture taken September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Edgar Su

“With all our e-commerce partners, we’re using data to help us find innovative solutions to unlock key barriers of high cost delivery and poor credit card penetration in remote areas,” said Anusha Babbar, e-commerce director at Unilever Southeast Asia and Australasia.

The conglomerate, which works with the likes of Singapore online grocer RedMart, Indonesia’s Blibli and Vietnam’s Tiki, said it introduced its St Ives skincare brand on Lazada after seeing a trend towards natural products and shopper search data.

DATA AND LOGISTICS

“Traditional retailers will struggle to see customer behavior,” said Lazada Thailand’s CEO, Alessandro Piscini. “We can tell if a customer is pregnant from their search behavior.”

Slideshow (10 Images)

Lazada, he said, plans to use data science to help its merchants customize offers for specific customer groups based on age, gender and other preferences.

Zalora, which sells clothing and accessories online in markets including Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, said it was working on ad-hoc projects with some brands to help them understand their customers based on data.

Lazada and Zalora are among the few e-commerce platforms that operate in multiple Southeast Asian countries. But the region is becoming a new battleground as Amazon (AMZN.O) and JD.com (JD.O) make beachheads in Singapore and Thailand.

Lazada Thailand will focus on partnering with fast-moving consumer goods companies to maintain its lead, Piscini said, and is expanding its logistics footprint across a region that has poor roads, clogged cities and thousands of often remote islands.

To be sure, online still contributes a tiny portion to consumer goods companies’ sales, but some local firms are going beyond partnerships and investing in their own e-commerce capabilities.

Thailand’s top consumer goods manufacturer Saha Group (SPI.BK) (SPC.BK) has seen online sales of some of its brands rise tenfold since it began a partnership with Lazada in June, but online still represents just 1-2 percent of total sales.

Saha is using e-commerce data to customize offerings.

“We now make real-time offerings to customers. Before, promotions would be seasonal,” Chairman Boonsithi Chokwatana told Reuters.

The company, whose products include instant noodles, toothpaste and laundry detergent, is investing 2 billion baht ($ 60 million) in logistics to support its e-commerce ambitions, including a 21-storey warehouse and a big data team, he said.

Reporting by Aradhana Aravindan in SINGAPORE and Chayut Setboonsarng in BANGKOJK; Editing by Ian Geoghegan

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Consumer goods firms harness online data to tap Southeast Asia e-commerce boom

SINGAPORE/BANGKOK (Reuters) – When diaper maker DSG International (Thailand) wants to know what its customers are thinking, it often turns to Lazada, an e-commerce firm majority-owned by Alibaba Group Holding (BABA.N).

FILE PHOTO: The Singapore Lazada website is seen in this illustration photo June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Thomas White/Illustration/File Photo

“From (their) data, we know mothers sometimes browse at night, so we can offer flash sales when we know customers are browsing,” says Ambrose Chan, the Thai company’s CEO.

Southeast Asia is the world’s fastest-growing internet market, home to 600 million consumers from Vietnam to Indonesia via Singapore, many of them tech- and social media-savvy. They are rapidly spending more time and money online. A Nielsen study in 2015 estimated Southeast Asia’s middle-class will hit 400 million by 2020, doubling from 2012.

Gross merchandise value of ecommerce in Southeast Asia will balloon to $ 65.5 billion by 2021, from $ 14.3 billion last year, predicts consultancy Frost & Sullivan.

Research firm Euromonitor forecasts internet retailing in Indonesia, for example, will more than double to $ 6.2 billion by 2021, and Thailand will increase 85 percent to $ 2.8 billion.

(For a graphic on Southeast Asia internet sales click reut.rs/2l3qULe)

Consumer goods firms, such as Unilever (UNc.AS) and Japanese cosmetics firm Shiseido (4911.T), say the e-commerce boom allows them to push deeper into markets that can otherwise be difficult to understand and tough to penetrate due to poor retail networks and infrastructure.

“Data from Lazada has been used to position certain products where consumer preferences are different. For example, Thai customers like to buy diapers in special cartons, while Malaysians prefer multiple packs,” says Chan.

To reach more customers and get a better handle on their online behavior, consumer goods companies are forging partnerships with e-commerce firms like Lazada and fashion website Zalora.

POWERFUL, INSIGHTFUL

A customer who clicked on a 50 milliliter product may instead buy a smaller 30 ml product, said Pranay Mehra, vice president, digital and e-commerce at Shiseido Asia Pacific, noting that data and online selling experience can help firms bundle offers, decide on packaging and distribution, and influence where to set up a physical presence.

“This data is very powerful and very insightful, if used properly,” Mehra added.

Unilever, whose products range from Hellmann’s mayonnaise to Dove soap, said it is seeing more demand from rural consumers in developing markets like Indonesia and Vietnam.

RedMart’s President Vikram Rupani poses at their fulfillment centre in Singapore September 22, 2017. Picture taken September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Edgar Su

“With all our e-commerce partners, we’re using data to help us find innovative solutions to unlock key barriers of high cost delivery and poor credit card penetration in remote areas,” said Anusha Babbar, e-commerce director at Unilever Southeast Asia and Australasia.

The conglomerate, which works with the likes of Singapore online grocer RedMart, Indonesia’s Blibli and Vietnam’s Tiki, said it introduced its St Ives skincare brand on Lazada after seeing a trend towards natural products and shopper search data.

DATA AND LOGISTICS

“Traditional retailers will struggle to see customer behavior,” said Lazada Thailand’s CEO, Alessandro Piscini. “We can tell if a customer is pregnant from their search behavior.”

Slideshow (10 Images)

Lazada, he said, plans to use data science to help its merchants customize offers for specific customer groups based on age, gender and other preferences.

Zalora, which sells clothing and accessories online in markets including Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, said it was working on ad-hoc projects with some brands to help them understand their customers based on data.

Lazada and Zalora are among the few e-commerce platforms that operate in multiple Southeast Asian countries. But the region is becoming a new battleground as Amazon (AMZN.O) and JD.com (JD.O) make beachheads in Singapore and Thailand.

Lazada Thailand will focus on partnering with fast-moving consumer goods companies to maintain its lead, Piscini said, and is expanding its logistics footprint across a region that has poor roads, clogged cities and thousands of often remote islands.

To be sure, online still contributes a tiny portion to consumer goods companies’ sales, but some local firms are going beyond partnerships and investing in their own e-commerce capabilities.

Thailand’s top consumer goods manufacturer Saha Group (SPI.BK) (SPC.BK) has seen online sales of some of its brands rise tenfold since it began a partnership with Lazada in June, but online still represents just 1-2 percent of total sales.

Saha is using e-commerce data to customize offerings.

“We now make real-time offerings to customers. Before, promotions would be seasonal,” Chairman Boonsithi Chokwatana told Reuters.

The company, whose products include instant noodles, toothpaste and laundry detergent, is investing 2 billion baht ($ 60 million) in logistics to support its e-commerce ambitions, including a 21-storey warehouse and a big data team, he said.

Reporting by Aradhana Aravindan in SINGAPORE and Chayut Setboonsarng in BANGKOJK; Editing by Ian Geoghegan

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Irish court gives $1 billion Apple data center green light

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Apple may proceed to build a 850 million euro ($ 1 billion) data center in Ireland, the High Court ruled on Thursday, bringing relief for the government after a two-year planning delay which it feared could hurt its reputation with investors.

Apple in February 2015 announced plans to build the data center in a rural location in the west of Ireland to take advantage of rich green energy sources nearby.

Planning permission was granted by the local council six months later, but a series of appeals blocked Apple from beginning work.

High Court judge Paul McDermott on Thursday dismissed two separate appeals against the planning permission, clearing the way for the project to proceed.

Ireland relies on foreign multinational companies for the creation of one in every 10 jobs across the economy and sees major investments such as data centers as a means of securing their presence in the country.

A similar Apple center announced at the same time in Denmark is due to begin operations later this year and Apple has announced it will build a second data center there.

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar met Apple executives last month and said they had made clear their frustration with the planning and judicial delays and warned the process would color decisions that they might make about future investments.

The government has said it is considering amending its planning laws to include data centers as strategic infrastructure, thus allowing them to get through the planning process much more quickly.

It has said it will be one of the biggest capital investment projects in the west of Ireland, providing 300 construction jobs and 150 on-site permanent jobs.

Writing by Conor Humphries and Padraic Halpin

Tech

Deloitte Is the Latest Target of a Cyber Attack With Confidential Client Data at Risk

Global accountancy firm Deloitte has been hit by a sophisticated hack that resulted in a breach of confidential information and plans from some of its biggest clients, Britain’s Guardian newspaper said on Monday.

Deloitte—one of the big four professional services providers—confirmed to the newspaper it had been hit by a hack, but it said only a small number of its clients had been impacted.

The firm discovered the hack in March, according to the Guardian, but the cyber attackers could have had breached its systems as long ago as October or November 2016.

The attack was believed to have been focused on the U.S. operations of the company, which provides auditing, tax advice, and consultancy to multinationals and governments worldwide.

“In response to a cyber incident, Deloitte implemented its comprehensive security protocol and began an intensive and thorough review including mobilizing a team of cybersecurity and confidentiality experts inside and outside of Deloitte,” a spokesman told the newspaper. “As part of the review, Deloitte has been in contact with the very few clients impacted and notified governmental authorities and regulators.”

A Deloitte spokeswoman declined immediate comment, saying that the firm would issue a statement shortly.

Tech

St. Louis Companies Combine Technology for World Class Data Center


St. Louis, Missouri (PRWEB) June 11, 2015

Hostirian, a St. Louis based Hosting and Managed Services company, has chosen Enlogic cabinets, cold-row air containment and intelligent PDUs managed by No Limits Software’s RaMP Data Center Infrastructure Management for their new data center. Both Enlogic and No Limits Software are also headquartered in St. Louis.

“We love that we can work with local companies providing world class solutions for our newest data center in the Globe Building,” said Ken Cox, Vice President of Operations at Hostirian. The 26,000 square foot data center in downtown St. Louis is the largest carrier hotel building in the region. “The new cold-row containment pod provides 800mm wide cabinets, multiple PDUs for redundant power, and make a great home for your equipment,” added Cox. Both of the Hostirian data centers are SSAE-16 compliant, offer HIPAA compliant hosting, and security includes video surveillance, RFID badge readers, and 24x7x365 onsite team members.

Enlogic is a global power management provider and winner of the 2014 DCS Power and Cooling Product of the Year awards. They offer a full lineup of data center solutions including intelligent PDUs, smart cabinets, air containment solutions, and a comprehensive line of environmental monitoring devices.

No Limits Software is a leading provider of data center management solutions, including asset and change management, capacity planning, and real-time monitoring. Their RaMP software is the only DCIM (Data Center Infrastructure Management) solution which provides auto-discovery, automated change management, and real-time monitoring of virtual machines, IT equipment (servers, network, storage), and facilities equipment (power, cooling, environmental). “We’re excited to be working with Enlogic and to be a part of one of the premier data centers in St. Louis,” said Dave Cole, president of No Limits Software. He adds that “the Hostirian team is very professional and their new data center is absolutely first class.”

About Hostirian

Hostirian is a St. Louis Hosting and Managed Services company providing Cloud Servers, Colocation, and Managed Services. Their around the clock Operations Support Services supplement customer teams by offering Help Desk, Monitoring, and SOC. They have 2 fiber connected data centers and over 14 years of experience working with small to medium sized businesses.

Learn more about Hostirian at http://www.hostirian.com.

About Enlogic

Enlogic was founded in 2011 by a group of former APC/Schneider Electric technology executives dedicated to providing innovative solutions to better address growing data center energy management needs. With a commitment to continuous innovation, Enlogic has become the technology leader and expert in data center energy management, helping data centers across the world to discover waste, improve operational efficiency and optimize energy utilization

Learn more about Enlogic at http://www.enlogic.com.

About No Limits Software

No Limits Software is a leading provider of data center management solutions, including asset and change management, capacity planning and real-time monitoring. Their RaMP DCIM flagship solution allows you to more effectively manage your data center. RaMP eliminates the need for physical audits, dramatically reduces the time to find and repair equipment, improves system availability and increases data center energy efficiency by providing accurate real-time monitoring.

Learn more about No Limits Software at http://www.nolimitssoftware.com.







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OneNeck? IT Solutions Earns ISO/IEC 27001:2013 Certification at Three Midwest Data Center Locations


Minneapolis (PRWEB) May 12, 2015

OneNeck® IT Solutions announced today it has earned ISO 27001:2013 certification at its Tier 3 data centers in the Midwest. Today’s announcement follows the company’s 2014 news that its Eden Prairie, Minn. facility was ISO 27001:2005 certified. Now, in addition to its Minnesota facility, OneNeck data centers in Des Moines, Iowa and Madison, Wis. are also ISO 27001 certified. The scope of the certification has also been expanded to include OneNeck’s headquarters in Scottsdale, Ariz.

ISO 27001 is a global security standard that sets requirements for the industry’s Information Security Management System (ISMS). In order to earn ISO 27001 certification, a company’s ISMS is reviewed. In addition, the review process includes scrutinization of the company’s information security controls to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of all sensitive information assets.

“We pursued this certification to assure our customers we were meeting the most widely accepted security management parameters in the industry,” said Clint Harder, CTO and senior vice president of Product Strategy at OneNeck. “Having an objective third-party assess our systematic approach affirms we are managing sensitive customer information and following internationally accepted best practices.”

The ISO 27001 ISMS at OneNeck was certified by BrightLine, a leading provider of attestation and compliance services. BrightLine is a CPA firm, an ISO Certification Body, a PCI Qualified Security Assessor, and a FedRAMP 3PAO.

The certification verifies that OneNeck is following the standard ISO information security management protocols and best practices as they relate to the company’s colocation services and operations at their headquarters in Arizona, as well their data centers in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

The ISO process includes a Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle for continuous quality improvement.

    Planning includes a review of policies and procedures; it looks at how and what is done to secure the environment and comply with the ISO 27001 standard.
    “Do” looks at implementation of policies and procedures.
    “Check” reviews internal audits, measures process performance, and reviews the effectiveness of the ISMS.
    Act is the action phase and includes making refinements and corrective actions based on the output of the check phase.

“Earning ISO 27001 certification is an ongoing process,” Harder added. “It ensures that OneNeck’s information security measures continue to be strong and effective. For our customers, it means we are ‘audit-ready’ which is critical to our customers with heavy compliance requirements. In fact, by achieving this certification, it helps streamline the due diligence process many of our customers must go through on an annual basis.”

OneNeck also regularly submits itself to third-party audits including a Type 2 SSAE 16 (SOC 1) examination, PCI DSS, HIPAA/HITECH AT 101, of which some of the control activities defined by OneNeck management align with ISO 27001.

To learn more about OneNeck, visit oneneck.com.

# # #

OneNeck IT Solutions LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Telephone and Data Systems, employs approximately 630 people throughout the U.S. The company offers a full suite of hybrid IT solutions including cloud and hosting solutions; ReliaCloud® enterprise cloud services; managed services; ERP application management; professional services; and IT hardware. OneNeck has Tier 3 data centers in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Arizona, Oregon and opening in July 2015 in Denver, Colorado. Visit oneneck.com for more information.

TDS Telecommunications Corp. (TDS®), headquartered in Madison, Wis., operates OneNeck IT Solutions LLC, TDS Baja Broadband LLC, and BendBroadband. Combined, the company employs 3,300 people. Visit tdstelecom.com.

Telephone and Data Systems, Inc. [NYSE: TDS] a Fortune 1000TM company, provides wireless; wireline and cable broadband, TV and voice; and hosted and managed services to approximately six million customers nationwide through its business units, U.S. Cellular, TDS Telecommunications Corp., OneNeck IT Solutions and BendBroadband. Founded in 1969 and headquartered in Chicago, TDS employs 10,600 people. Visit tdsinc.com.







Optimizing Entire Data Center Without Breaking Budget

Optimizing Entire Data Center Without Breaking Budget
In a recent article from DCK, we outlined how Rackspace introduced dedicated servers which behaved like cloud VMs. The offering, called OnMetal, provides cloud Servers which are single-tenant, bare-metal systems. You can provision services in minutes …
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International Business Machines Corp. To Open New Cloud Centers
IBM announced in a conference on Monday that it is expanding its geographical presence by introducing cloud server in additional markets. The company is looking forward to taking its corporate clouds to Italy, India, Canada, and Australia …
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How to choose between cloud computing and virtualization
Server virtualization predates private cloud, and gained popularity due to massive CapEx savings. A few hypervisor hosts and a management console replaces dozens or even hundreds of physical servers. Data centers deploy virtualization and gain huge …
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Nokia Networks expands telco cloud portfolio
Nokia said its Radio Cloud solution can be built on multiple network layers starting with radio hardware and antennas at the cell site, which are connected to distributed cloud servers through fronthaul. The cloud servers combine the cells into one …
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10 Cloud Roadblocks and What to Do About Them
Your clients may object to storing their content on cloud servers, which often times is built into business agreements. Right or wrong, this can completely derail any good intentions you may have about moving to the cloud. Clients that are in heavily …
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High-Tech 0 Mil Pro Soccer Stadium Makes Its Debut
All of it will be delivered by Avaya's cloud technology sent wirelessly from remote servers, she said. Avaya officials said the stadium's technological features would be ready for the Earthquake's first regular season game there against the Chicago …
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Growing Demand for Blue Box Cloud Drives Expanded North American and European Data Centers for OpenStack-Powered Private Cloud as a Service


SEATTLE, Wash. (PRWEB UK) 25 February 2015

Customer growth in Europe and the United States is prompting Blue Box—a Seattle-based provider of on-demand OpenStack-powered private cloud as a service (PCaaS) solutions—to continue executing on its global capacity expansion. The company has expanded its relationship with Juniper Networks to build new capacity for its Blue Box Cloud solution at two data centers, one in London and the other at an existing facility in Ashburn.

The opening of the company’s first data center in the U.K. makes Blue Box Cloud available to European customers who require European Union (EU) data center residency.

This is the first full data center that Blue Box is building with integrated routing, switching and security technology exclusively from Juniper Networks. Blue Box will use Juniper Networks® SRX Series Services Gateways to secure its network, and has standardized on Juniper Networks MX480 3D Universal Edge Routers, QFX5100 data center switches and EX4200 Ethernet switches.

With the London expansion, Blue Box increases its global footprint for Blue Box Cloud to four locations, aligning with key markets in North America and EMEA. The London data center will meet EU data sovereignty requirements and join an existing European data center for Blue Box Cloud in Zurich.

The Ashburn data center expansion doubles the company’s current Blue Box Cloud capacity in that facility. The expansion is in response to growing demand from Blue Box Cloud customers requiring additional compute and storage resources to support new and growing application workloads hosted in the facility.

European Proof of Concept Program Underway

Blue Box recently announced a proof-of-concept (PoC) program for European customers evaluating OpenStack-powered private clouds. The program helps customers determine whether a hosted or an on-prem private cloud solution is better suited to their workloads. As part of the launch of the PoC and the new U.K. data center, Blue Box will sponsor Cloud Expo Europe in London on March 11 and 12. European companies interested in Blue Box Cloud can schedule one-on-one meetings with Blue Box senior management by signing up here. Blue Box is targeting participants in market sectors with specific workloads requiring control, performance, security and predictability in a variety of sectors, including media and entertainment, financial services, technology and retail.

Cloud Expo Europe Exhibition Information

Blue Box is exhibiting with the OpenStack Foundation and other OpenStack community members in the Open Cloud Park, Pod #3, at Cloud Expo Europe. In addition, Blue Box CTO and founder Jesse Proudman will speak during two sessions:

1.    Public vs Private vs Hybrid Cloud: Which One? (in the Open Cloud Theater)

2.    Interoperability on the Cloud: Myth or Reality? (Panel in Cloud Service Providers & Business Theater)

Private Cloud as a Service Benefits

PCaaS is a term describing private cloud infrastructure resources deployed in a managed environment, on hardware dedicated to specific customers. PCaaS provides the security, performance and cost stability of private cloud, coupled with the agility, scalability and handsfree management common to public clouds. Blue Box Cloud is an OpenStack-powered PCaaS solution that offers the additional benefits of Cloud Foundry Platform as a Service.

Growth Response to Customer Demand

“Blue Box Cloud delivers all of the benefits of a private cloud while removing the burden of day-to-day infrastructure operations. That combination means our customers can focus on developing applications that drive true value to their businesses. Existing customer growth and new deployments will continue to drive our plans for expanding both our data center footprint as well as capacity at existing facilities in the year ahead.”

— Matthew Schiltz, CEO of Blue Box

Networking and Security Powered by Juniper Networks

“We are proud to deliver the technology that will secure private cloud as a service to new customers as Blue Box continues to expand and grow. Blue Box, with its operational expertise and software capabilities, is successfully deploying reliable and secure private clouds quickly in production environments, and we are excited that Juniper will power the new facility in Europe – and the expanded facility in Ashburn.”

— Mike Marcellin, senior vice president of marketing and strategy at Juniper Networks

About Blue Box

Blue Box delivers Private Cloud as a Service (PCaaS) to customers worldwide. The company’s technology platform leverages decades of operational expertise in cloud and distributed systems to deliver Blue Box Cloud—a managed, hosted private cloud on dedicated hardware, powered by OpenStack and available and scalable on demand. Blue Box Cloud delivers core benefits of both public and private clouds in one offering. Blue Box meets the control, performance, and security needs of customers in a wide range of industries, including healthcare, financial services, digital media, gaming, technology and retail. Learn more about Seattle-based Blue Box at blueboxcloud.com or find Blue Box on Twitter at @bluebox.

###

Media Contact:

Robert Cathey

Cathey Communications for Blue Box

robert(at)cathey(dot)co

+1 865-386-6118

@robertcathey







IBM adds 12 Cloud Data Centers, Endorses OpenStack Throughout

IBM adds 12 Cloud Data Centers, Endorses OpenStack Throughout
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Read more on Data Center Knowledge

Red Hat, Huawei Partner on OpenStack for NFV
The two vendors want to combine Huawei's expertise with telecommunications companies with Red Hat's open-source and OpenStack capabilities to help service providers embrace OpenStack as they adopt network-functions virtualization (NFV) in their …
Read more on eWeek

Brocade Certifies Virtual Network Tool for Mirantis OpenStack
Networking solutions provider Brocade has deepened its integration and relationship with Mirantis and its OpenStack distribution. The company has certified its open source virtual network automation tool Fuel for use with Mirantis and has been ensuring …
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Who are the OpenStack Ambassadors?
With over 75 user groups in more than 50 countries around the world, OpenStack certainly isn't lacking for popularity, but these regional groups often need support and resources above and beyond what the small professional staff at the OpenStack …
Read more on opensource.com

SIS Expands Cloud Computing Capacity with Expedient Data Centers

SIS Expands Cloud Computing Capacity with Expedient Data Centers
To continue providing the best in data security and availability for an ever-expanding Partner XE user base, Strategic Insurance Software (SIS) has upgraded data hosting capabilities and increased capacity in the cloud computing infrastructure …
Read more on DigitalJournal.com

Cartika Offers Reliable High-Performance Microsoft Exchange Cloud Hosting
Cartika Microsoft Exchange Cloud Hosting Solutions For Business can be hosted in the company's data centers in the US and Canada, allowing clients to choose their hosting venue and avoid the data sovereignty and regulatory issues associated with many …
Read more on Virtual-Strategy Magazine (press release)

OpenStack breaks open the floodgates for big data in the cloud with Juno

OpenStack breaks open the floodgates for big data in the cloud with Juno
OpenStack logo The OpenStack Foundation unveiled the Juno release of its popular open source cloud stack on October 16 marking its 10th major release. The project features a number of new improvements and advances including the Sahara Data …
Read more on SiliconANGLE (blog)

EVIL patent TROLLS poised to attack OpenStack, says Linux protection squad
A group established to shield Linux from patent trolls has warned OpenStack will be the next big target for intellectual property hoarders. The Open Invention Network (OIN) reckons the open-source cloud is ripe for the plucking by trolls, who would …
Read more on Register